Lubhoo - Kathmandu Valley - Nepal

Teej festival - Pashipatinath nabij Kathmandu

Lubhoo - Kathmandu Valley - Nepal

Lubhoo – so close yet so unique

There is an interesting folklore explaining how Lubhoo, which in Newari means “Golden plate” got its name. It is believed that there was a homosexual resident who worshipped Maha Laxmi and Gobhrateshwar Mahadev to resolve his confused sexual orientation. After three years of devoted worship, the Gods were finally happy and granted the worshipper the body of a “complete man”. Knowing no bounds for his ecstasy upon this, the devotee is said to have offered both the deities plates made of gold, and hence named the place “Lunbhoo”, meaning the same.

Around six kilometres east of Lalitpur is Lubhoo, a village so rich in culture, history and camaraderie that it will take your breath away.
There is an interesting folklore explaining how Lubhoo, which in Newari means “Golden plate” got its name. It is believed that there was a homosexual resident who worshipped Maha Laxmi and Gobhrateshwar Mahadev to resolve his confused sexual orientation. After three years of devoted worship, the Gods were finally happy and granted the worshipper the body of a “complete man”. Knowing no bounds for his ecstasy upon this, the devotee is said to have offered both the deities plates made of gold, and hence named the place “Lunbhoo”, meaning the same.
The Lubhoo people have their own unique Jatras and festival, the most famous being the Maha Laxmi-Maha Bhairav Jatra observed in the month of Baishakh (April-May). This is the time of the year when the whole of the Newari community of Lubhoo gets out of their daily monotonies to celebrate in a truly carefree fashion.
The two chariots garaged inside the temple of Maha Laxmi are loaded with the gold-plated masks of the deities that are housed in the same. While one of the chariots is used to carry a set of Maha Laxmi, Ganesh and Kumar statuettes, the other carries another set of Maha Laxmi, Ganesh and Kumari. The chariot is the hoisted by drunken revelers to make a complete tour of all the houses in the locality, followed an elaborate Bhoj (feast), which is an essential part of the merrymaking.
Bringing the Maha Laxmi closer to your home is believed to bring you auspices of peace and prosperity. And so is the existence of the Maha Laxmi Temple in the sunny vicinity of simple but very social people.
In fact, there is another temple further up the location of the main Maha Laxmi Temple that houses the mother of Goddess Maha Laxmi. During the Jatra or procession, the statuette of the daughter divinity is mounted on the same Raths or chariots and taken to her mother's temple so that the mother-daughter meeting can take place, makring the climax of the carnival.
The temple's religious architectures date back to the Malla periods, according to stone inscriptions. The head of the Maha Laxmi temple is called the Thakali and is also the eldest member of the community's Guthi (guild, trust).

The current Thakali and curator of the holy place is 86-years-old Rudra Lal Shrestha who informs that there are altogether five layers of gold-plated masks of the above mentioned deities enshrined in the temple. As soon as the existing one gets even a slight damage, the figurines are covered by yet another layer of the masks made of precious metals and plated by gold. There is also a tall white temple of the Gobhrateshwar Mahadev built in the same style as that of the Krishna Mandir of Patan, that makes for an interesting piece of structure to study as well as revere.
The settlement in the 730 acres of land of Lubhoo mostly has the dominance of Bahuns in the outskirts and an ethnic Newari community of usually Shresthas, Maharjans, Rajthala and Gubhaju in the main town area. A special feature of this area is that almost every house has cottage handloom and cloth making activity. So in totality, the whole of Lubhoo is a major textile producing area that sends products to local garment factories and tourist areas like Thamel. Some houses still have the traditional wooden handloom whereas some residents own textile factories powered by electric looms. Actually, farming is the main source of income while cloth weaving is a part and parcel of their daily life.

 

 

 

Nepal verslag index

18 december 2004 - 29 januari 2005 - Terug in Kathmandu / fietsen naar Sundarijal / Balaju-park

24 november - 17 december 2004 - Streetdance / Bungamati & Khokana / goede doel

6 november - 23 november - Pokhara, Jomson-trekking, Annapurna-gebergte

23 oktober - 5 november 2004 - Changu Narayan, Phutung, Pokhara

12 oktober - 23 oktober 2004 - Verslag #5 Uitzicht Himalaya / Dashain / kinderhuis

5 oktober - 12 oktober 2004 verslag week 4 Dashain/ Tihar festivals / borrel ambassade / Chobhar kloof / Nagarjun

28 september - 5 oktober 2004 - Verslag week 3 (Nepalese taalles, lezing Lama Rimpoche, Budhanilkantha, computerlessen in kinderhuis)

21 - 28 september 2004 - Verslag 2 - o.a. Bouddhanath, Kirtipur en Indra Jatra festival

15 -21 september 2004 - Verslag 1 - o.a. aankomst in Nepal, Swayambhunath en kinderhuis

 

 

Kirtipur / Tatopani / Gosainkund Lake

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nepal Cultuur / Historie / Politiek / Economie

Nepal reizigers-informatie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loshar - Tibetan - New Year / vrijwilligerswerk-nepal / ontwikkelingshulp india

 

 


 

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